Robert L. Peters

15 April 2014

Gratitude bestows reverence… changing forever how we experience life and the world.

John Milton (1608-1674)


Introducing… Saki Mafundikwa

Saki_Mafundikwa_portrait

Saki_Mafundikwa_Rasta_farmer

Saki_Mafundikwa_TED

Saki_Mafundikwa_Afrikan_Alphabets

Saki_Mafundikwa_book_spread

ZIVA

Harare, Zimbabwe

I feel privileged to call Saki Mafundikwa my friend. I’d like to introduce him and his current initiative with ZIVA to those of you who visit my blog.

Saki is a typographer, graphic designer, photographer, filmmaker, author of Afrikan Alphabets (the first book on Afrikan typography), a recent TED presenter (great talk!) and yes, an old-school farmer. After a long sojourn through the world of design and media in the United States, Saki returned to his native country where, amidst social and political upheavals, he managed to found and recently expand ZIVA into a program that galvanizes intrinsic design values.

The Zimbabwe Institute of Vigital Arts, or ZIVA, was started by Saki Mafundikwa in 1999 as the first school of digital design, new media, and visual communication in Zimbabwe. Since its birth, ZIVA has produced a plethora of award-winning students and inspired design practitioners.

ZIVA has recently started an Indeigogo campaign with a fundraising goal of USD $100,000. These funds will be allocated to changing HP laptops to powerful desktop computers, changing Photoshop CS2 to the most current Adobe Suite software, updating technical design manuals to the latest on the market, to expanding faculty, and last but definitely not least, to providing full scholarships to deserving and talented young designers.

How can you help? Please share the campaign link (or this post) and/or consider donating to this worthwhile cause. Saki and I both “thank you in advance…” from the bottom of our hearts.


12 April 2014

Beauty Revealed

Beauty_Revealed_Sarah_Goodridge

Boston, Massachusetts, 1828

I came across an image of this exquisite miniature yesterday (6.7 cm x 8 cm, watercolour on ivory), and was intrigued to find out about its origin.

Painted as a self-portrait by Sarah Goodridge and given to statesman Daniel Webster after his wife died (Webster sat as a model for Sarah twelve times over two decades), it presents a provocative twist on the “traditional lover’s eye miniatures so popular in London” at the time. I know it would have gotten my attention…

Below is another watercolour-on-ivory self-portrait miniature done by Sarah (who never did marry) two years later, in 1830 (10.2 cm x 7.6 cm).

Miniature_Sarah_Goodridge_Self_Portrait


10 April 2014

Rise up, rise up…

rise_up_rise_up

(Click on image for higher resolution. Feel free to use or share).


9 April 2014

To change, a person must face the dragon of his appetites with another dragon, the life-energy of the soul.

—Rumi


8 April 2014

People will stare. Make it worth their while.

Harry Winston (1896-1978)


Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear.

—Albert Camus


7 April 2014

I accept chaos. I’m not sure whether it accepts me.

—Bob Dylan


4 April 2014

Worry gives a small thing a big shadow.

—Swedish proverb


3 April 2014

I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.

John Cage (1912-1992)


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