Robert L. Peters

8 February 2015

But first…

Nuts

(-: original image source unknown)


7 February 2015

Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced.

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855)


4 February 2015

Jolene at 33 rpm…

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Odd as it may seem…

Someone figured out that Dolly Parton’s hit song “Jolene” (from her 1973 album with the same name) sounds unexpectedly good when slowed down from 45 rpm to 33 rpm. Parton has said the inspiration for this song came from a redheaded bank teller who she believed charmed her husband… (ear-worm warning).

My kid brother, John Paul Peters, is a music producer and sound engineer. Here’s his explanation:

Dolly Parton has a very short throat. Her vocal sounds quite nasal by any standards and so when you drop the pitch and speed of the song it sounds like a guy would sound naturally. Usually, when you drop the speed and pitch of the song it sounds unnaturally deep, but, since Dolly Parton has such a small throat and quick vibrato, her texture works fine and she actually sounds plausibly male!”

Click here or on the image to listen; click here to download an MP3 file.

(source)


25 January 2015

Hands of time…

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(original image source unknown)


24 January 2015

The Look of Silk… The First Session of Cross Strait Silk Culture and Creativity Forum and International Silk Creative Design Expo

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Shenzhen, China

One of 2014’s highlights for me was to participate in The Look of Silk, (The First Session of Cross Strait Silk Culture and Creativity Forum and International Silk Creative Design Expo) sponsored by China Tong Yuan Co., Ltd., Shenzhen China Silk Park, and the Taiwan Cultural and Creative Industry Association.

As one of “eight internationally renowned designers” I was invited to design a pattern for silk scarves, participate in the 5-day event in Shenzhen, and to give a keynote address. A design team from Taiwan was commissioned to develop 80 different silk products using our designs, “creating a systematically multicultural design integrating multiple aspects.”

The Look of Silk plans to “keep alive the spirit of traditional Chinese culture and the international role played by silk in the past, while creating a brand image and market orientation for Chinese silk” by means of innovative creative activities.

I recently received images from the organizers of my silk design applied to various products (from bed linens to ties, cushions, padded laptop cases, and other fashion accessories). Shown above is a small sampling… my original design was in oranges and reds, but the product design team decided to also iterate it in blue and green.

Click on the image below or here for a larger view of my silk pattern design (135mm x 135mm) entitled Occidental Habitué. Details of the design can be viewed at my original blog post, here

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Occidental Habitué

Thousands of icons, images, and visual impressions cross our consciousness daily, weaving rich cultural narratives and imbuing meaningful memories. As travellers, émigrés, and nomads in a shrinking world we wrap ourselves in layers of sensuous, intertwined experience.

My concept involves the creation of an intentionally layered, quirky, and semi-random collage, providing unexpected juxtapositions that draw in the viewer and then reward curiosity with serendipitous surprises of simultaneity. Ancient meets modern, complex collides with simple, small bests large.

Luminous color acts as a background for layered, multidirectional, copyright-free imagery from earlier eras — visual ephemera, linear diagrams, Victorian etchings, old prints, ornaments, printers’ spot illustrations, ad cuts, and clip art — from ancient cave paintings to art deco elements, from flora and fauna to whimsical human inventions.

As if floating above this nuanced visual composition, a repeating directional diamond pattern of contemporary symbols and info-graphic icons (from The Noun Project, an online “visual language” resource of icons created by a global community) lends added dimension, with icons varying in color in a top-to-bottom gradation, complementary to the hue of the background.

A symbol of the globe glows in the fabric’s center.

© 2014 Robert L. Peters


18 January 2015

Even if we could turn back, we’d probably never end up where we started…

Haruki Murakami


31 December 2014

The Littlest Hand

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Congratulations to dear friend Suchot Sunday, first-place winner of the 2014 poetry writing contest sponsored by the Winnipeg Free Press and the Writers’ Collective of Manitoba.


13 November 2014

There are no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds.

Gilbert K. Chesterton (1874-1936)


4 November 2014

Beautiful Linguistic Family Tree

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(somewhere in the post-apocolyptic North)

“When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).”

“Lessons on language families are often illustrated with a simple tree diagram that has all the information but lacks imagination. There’s no reason linguistics has to be so visually uninspiring. Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram.”

Access the full-size diagram here. (Source).


13 October 2014

Friends… since birth.

Antropomorphic_Hug

Winnipeg Beach, Manitoba… while digging up carrots yesterday.


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