Robert L. Peters

7 November 2018

There is a crack in everything…

leonardcohen

Montreal, Canada

It’s two years ago today since poet/troubadour Leonard Cohen moved on into the next dimension. I came across this insightful tribute by Maria Popova online (with thanks to Brenda Sanderson for the link)…

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There Is a Crack in Everything, That’s How the Light Gets In: Leonard Cohen on Democracy and Its Redemptions

A generous reminder that we must aim for “a revelation in the heart rather than a confrontation or a call-to-arms or a defense.”

Trained as a poet and ordained as a Buddhist monk, Leonard Cohen (September 21, 1934–November 7, 2016) is our patron saint of sorrow and redemption. He wrote songs partway between philosophy and prayer — songs radiating the kind of prayerfulness which Simone Weil celebrated as “the rarest and purest form of generosity.”

One of his most beloved lyric lines, from the song “Anthem” — a song that took Cohen a decade to write — remains what is perhaps the most meaningful message for our troubled and troubling times: “There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.” It springs from a central concern of Cohen’s life and work, one which he revisited in various guises across various songs — including in “Suzanne,” where he writes “look among the garbage and the flowers / there are heroes in the seaweed,” and in the iconic “Hallelujah”: “There’s a blaze of light / In every word / It doesn’t matter which you heard / The holy or the broken Hallelujah”.

Read the whole post on Brain Pickings


23 September 2018

Timely, quite deft, often on the nose…

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A-Final-Solution

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Digging-in-the-Dirt

End-Game

It’s been a while since I shared the (sometimes acerbic) works of Mr. Fish


13 September 2018

Oldest known drawing by human hands…?

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Blombos Cave (near Capetown), South Africa

“Nine red lines on a stone flake found in a South African cave may be the earliest known drawing made by Homo sapiens, archaeologists reported on Wednesday. The artifact, which scientists think is about 73,000 years old, predates the oldest previously known modern human abstract drawings from Europe by about 30,000 years.”

“We knew a lot of things Homo sapiens could do, but we didn’t know they could do drawings back then,” said Christopher Henshilwood, an archaeologist from the University of Bergen in Norway and lead author of the study…

(full story here, or here)


19 November 2017

Nothing thicker than a knife’s blade separates happiness from melancholy.

Woolf

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


17 November 2017

Over two million biodiversity illustrations… online.

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The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL), an “open access digital library for biodiversity literature and archives,” has for many years been making it easy for people to connect to nature through nature writing and illustration. Its “first stream,” currently at 122,281 images, has been carefully curated, and includes searchable galleries and albums divided by book title or subject, such as “Exotic botany illustrated,” “The Birds of Australia v.1,” and “Bats!” Its “second stream,” consisting of over 2 million images, is a massive grab-bag of photos, illlustrations from nature, advertisements, and imaginative renderings.

This digital library offers potential for chance discovery through “the aimless wandering that often leads to serendipitously sublime experiences.” The image archives “offer expansive views of humanity’s encounter with the natural world, not only through statistics and academic jargon, but through the artistic recording of wonder, scientific curiosity, and deep appreciation.” Many of the images allow “zooming in” to carefully observe details of the artists’ illustrative processes.

Enjoy! (source)

 


1 April 2015

If I do not write to empty my mind, I go mad.

— George Gordon Byron, aka Lord Byron (1788-1824)


14 March 2015

Presenting… Ronald Shakespear

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Buenos Aires, Argentina

View photographic images by and of Ronald Shakespear, my southern compañero, here.


8 February 2015

But first…

Nuts

(-: original image source unknown)


24 January 2015

The Look of Silk… The First Session of Cross Strait Silk Culture and Creativity Forum and International Silk Creative Design Expo

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Shenzhen, China

One of 2014’s highlights for me was to participate in The Look of Silk, (The First Session of Cross Strait Silk Culture and Creativity Forum and International Silk Creative Design Expo) sponsored by China Tong Yuan Co., Ltd., Shenzhen China Silk Park, and the Taiwan Cultural and Creative Industry Association.

As one of “eight internationally renowned designers” I was invited to design a pattern for silk scarves, participate in the 5-day event in Shenzhen, and to give a keynote address. A design team from Taiwan was commissioned to develop 80 different silk products using our designs, “creating a systematically multicultural design integrating multiple aspects.”

The Look of Silk plans to “keep alive the spirit of traditional Chinese culture and the international role played by silk in the past, while creating a brand image and market orientation for Chinese silk” by means of innovative creative activities.

I recently received images from the organizers of my silk design applied to various products (from bed linens to ties, cushions, padded laptop cases, and other fashion accessories). Shown above is a small sampling… my original design was in oranges and reds, but the product design team decided to also iterate it in blue and green.

Click on the image below or here for a larger view of my silk pattern design (135mm x 135mm) entitled Occidental Habitué. Details of the design can be viewed at my original blog post, here

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Occidental Habitué

Thousands of icons, images, and visual impressions cross our consciousness daily, weaving rich cultural narratives and imbuing meaningful memories. As travellers, émigrés, and nomads in a shrinking world we wrap ourselves in layers of sensuous, intertwined experience.

My concept involves the creation of an intentionally layered, quirky, and semi-random collage, providing unexpected juxtapositions that draw in the viewer and then reward curiosity with serendipitous surprises of simultaneity. Ancient meets modern, complex collides with simple, small bests large.

Luminous color acts as a background for layered, multidirectional, copyright-free imagery from earlier eras — visual ephemera, linear diagrams, Victorian etchings, old prints, ornaments, printers’ spot illustrations, ad cuts, and clip art — from ancient cave paintings to art deco elements, from flora and fauna to whimsical human inventions.

As if floating above this nuanced visual composition, a repeating directional diamond pattern of contemporary symbols and info-graphic icons (from The Noun Project, an online “visual language” resource of icons created by a global community) lends added dimension, with icons varying in color in a top-to-bottom gradation, complementary to the hue of the background.

A symbol of the globe glows in the fabric’s center.

© 2014 Robert L. Peters


1 November 2014

Project Thirty-Three

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Seattle, USA

Project Thirty-Three celebrates “vintage record jackets that convey their message with only simple shapes and typography… a personal collection and shrine to circles and dots, squares and rectangles, and triangles, and the designers that make these shapes come to life on album covers.”


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